Tagged With Electricity
Sales of the century
1 April 2006
The European Commission says it intends to clamp down on the large-scale mergers that are threatening to kill off competition. But few expect the wave of M&A taking place among Europe's gas and power firms to end just yet. NJ Watson reports
US goes big on biomass
1 March 2006
Escalating world oil demand, dwindling supplies and the concern over supply interruptions have focused attention on alternative fuels and technologies. Biomass is one of them, writes Chris Webb
No longer treading water
1 March 2006
Tidal power is a relative newcomer to the renewables party, but its predictability – an advantage over competing renewable energy sources – is raising its profile in Europe and Asia, writes Chris Webb
Power plays
1 January 2006
Southeast Europe is the new investment frontier for international power companies, although progress towards opening the electricity markets in the region is likely to be halting. By NJ Watson
Nuclear makes US comeback
1 January 2006
The need for energy independence and fuel diversity, environmental concerns and growing public support are behind a resurgence of nuclear power in the US, writes Ellen Lask
Nuclear U-turn
1 January 2006
IT WAS hailed as a signpost to a renewables-powered future by the Parliamentary Renewable and Sustainable Energy Group and enthusiastically welcomed by environmentalists. But the 2003 White Paper that aimed to define a long-term strategic vision for energy policy, combining the environment, security of supply, competitiveness and social goals, now appears hopelessly outdated. Chris Webb writes
Gas price woes
1 January 2006
UK gas consumers had a shock in November when spot prices suddenly increased five-fold. They remained high into last month. With nine years of net exports having come to an end in 2004 and North Sea gas production forecast to decline fairly rapidly, some say price spikes will be a continuing feature of the UK market. Others say large-scale imports, through infrastructure due to be completed this year and next, could help to restore price stability, Martin Quinlan writes
Majors cast their eyes east
29 November 2005
BP AND OTHER majors are showing renewed appetite for investing in China's downstream. But large-scale equity partnerships still present a risk for IOCs and may not be to Beijing's liking, writes James Gavin.
Facing an electric storm
29 November 2005
China is facing a large gap between electricity demand and supply in the long term. NJ Watson reports on what the is country doing to mitigate the problem
Let there be light
1 November 2005
The European Electricity Directive, like the Gas Directive of 1998, was updated in 2003 because of 'significant shortcomings and possibilities for improving the functioning of the market'. Two years on, Liz Bossley, Richard Cockburn and Rob Kelvey consider the lack of progress towards a fully liberalised European market
Iran: unfulfilled potential
1 November 2005
Sitting on the world's second-largest gas reserves, Iran could be a major supplier to growing world markets, but exports only 126bn cf/y by pipeline to Turkey. Years of sanctions and political instability have deterred investment and grand LNG export plans are yet to leave the drawing board, writes Ayesha Daya
Back from the dead
1 October 2005
Rising oil and gas prices have led to one of the greatest comebacks in UK corporate history – from the verge of bankruptcy, British Energy's share price has almost doubled this year. But some analysts say the renaissance of the UK's nuclear generator is not sustainable writes Robert Lea
Reversal of fortune
1 October 2005
A return to profit
1 July 2005
Suez's has finally turned the corner after a terrible period. But a cloud still hangs over the French industrial and services group in the form of a dispute with a minority shareholder over its complex structure, writes Nick Watson
Scottish Power bets on US wind farms
1 July 2005
Despite enabling it to return £2.5bn of cash to shareholders, Scottish Power's US adventure looked like it had come to a sticky end with the company's exit from its under-performing PacifiCorp unit and the £1bn write-off that followed. But its decision to hang on to PPM Energy, a rapidly growing US wind business, suggests it has merely changed tack, writes Robert Lea