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LNG to Power Forum - Dubai

As the world accelerates the electrification of its energy economy – to meet fast-rising demand for electrically powered equipment and vehicles, and as the centrepiece of strategies to mitigate climate change – MENA countries face an unusual combination of opportunities and challenges: Join in the debate about what the future holds for LNG to Power in the MENA region.

New Date: Wednesday 4 November 2020

As the world accelerates the electrification of its energy economy – to meet fast-rising demand for electrically powered equipment and vehicles, and as the centrepiece of strategies to mitigate climate change – MENA countries face an unusual combination of opportunities and challenges:


· While the region as a whole is hydrocarbon-rich, this resource wealth is unevenly distributed; some countries have abundant resources while others import almost all their oil and/or gas.

· Oil is still widely used for electricity generation, despite its high cost. Even oil-rich  exporters face continuing pressure to substitute other fuels so that oil is freed up for export.

· The hot, arid climate creates demand not just for electricity to power air conditioners but also for desalination plants that convert seawater into potable water.

· The many hours of sunshine make the region especially suitable for solar power. However, intermittent, asynchronous renewables require backup power and synchronous generation to provide grid stability.

· Coal and nuclear power make a negligible contribution to the electricity supply of most MENA countries.

Natural gas – with its high hydrogen content – is well suited to exploiting these opportunities and meeting these challenges. Gas already has a large share of the power fuel mix in many MENA countries but will be needed in ever greater volumes for electricity generation as populations rise and economies grow. 

The MENA region has become a significant LNG importer because LNG brings a flexibility that pipeline gas cannot match, especially in new and expanding markets. But natural gas, liquefied or not, is nevertheless a fossil fuel and faces growing opposition from environmental groups and the investment community.

Registration will be re-opening very soon. 

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