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Nafta 2.0: Dealing with the Devil

Despite being such a prominent component of the trade relationship, energy has hardly come up in Nafta talks. That could change

It's well known that Canada and the US share the longest undefended border in the world. What's less acknowledged is that they also share the world's largest bilateral trading relationship, amounting to almost $1 trillion a year, a partnership which has more than doubled since the North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta) was implemented in 1993. A substantial chunk of that trade is in oil. Energy alone accounted for a fifth of all Canadian exports to the US in 2016—and that was in a year when oil prices were down, according to the Energy Information Administration. Now, President Donald Trump is threatening to upend a status quo that began with the Canada-US Free Trade Agreement in 1988

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