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US exports rise after surge in oil and gas production

The increase in US oil and gas production will be felt in nearly every corner of the global energy market for years to come

Early next year, a tanker laden with super-chilled gas from US shale fields will set sail from Cheniere Energy’s newly built Sabine Pass LNG export plant on the Gulf Coast. It won’t be the first time US gas leaves its borders – exports to Mexico and Canada have been on the rise and a small Alaskan LNG plant has been shipping gas across the Pacific for years – but it will mark an important moment in the transformation of US energy relations with the rest of the world.  Surging oil and gas production over the past decade has made export options a reality, upending well-established global energy trade flows in the process. In addition to LNG exports, pipeline gas shipments to Mexico and Canada

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