Related Articles
Forward article link
Share PDF with colleagues

Kazakhstan’s brewing crisis

Violence in the country’s energy patch and haziness about who will be replacing its ageing dictator are exacerbating the pain of the oil-price collapse

KAZAKHSTAN is in a state of flux. The central Asian state, which holds the world's 11th largest oil reserves, was the scene of another violent insurrection in June. The government first blamed the incident - which claimed almost two dozen lives in the country's oil belt - on Islamist foreigners out to destablise the country. Then it said it was an attempted coup by a local businessman. Either way, it's a sign of wider problems. A group of young men attacked two firearm shops on 5 June in Aktobe, located 100km from the Russian border, and tried to carry out an attack on a military base to seize arms. Thirteen attackers, five police officers and three soldiers were killed in gunfights. Author

Also in this section
Trump's Iran move and oil
13 October 2017
The market should not ignore the geopolitical risks if the nuclear deal now unravels
India—demand dynamo
13 October 2017
India's economic success will make it a decisive player in global energy for decades
Nafta 2.0: Dealing with the Devil
12 October 2017
Despite being such a prominent component of the trade relationship, energy has hardly come up in Nafta talks. That could change