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Democratic deficits

Ukraine’s prime minister survives for now, but the battles for power – and control of the energy sector – continue

More than a month has passed since Arseniy Yatsenyuk’s government survived a vote of no confidence. The dismissal of a deeply unpopular prime minister might have pacified an unhappy public for a while, but as things stand Yatsenyuk could have immunity until at least the autumn – when parliament’s next chance to unseat him arises. Either way, it matters for Naftogaz and Ukraine’s energy sector, which is at the centre of the politicking. The unsuccessful vote has given rise to murmurings of conspiracy between President Petro Poroshenko, an opponent of Yatsenyuk, and a number of oligarchs, further unsettling parliament. Members of minority parties Batkivschina and Samopomich have announced th

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