Related Articles
Forward article link
Share PDF with colleagues

Central Asia

CENTRAL Asia is benefiting from the angst gripping energy consumers worldwide. Central Asian gas, regarded as too difficult to produce by all except Russia at the start of the decade, is now viewed as a desirable resource.

CENTRAL Asia is benefiting from the angst gripping energy consumers worldwide. Central Asian gas, regarded as too difficult to produce by all except Russia at the start of the decade, is now viewed as a desirable resource. Rich uranium mines in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan have caught the attention of countries turning to nuclear-power generation as an alternative to oil and gas. In the 1990s, Western and Russian oil investors were the principal investors in the region. Now, Asian – particularly Chinese – companies are playing a much more prominent role. State-owned companies from South Korea, India and China are negotiating for blocks in the Caspian Sea offshore Kazakhstan – by far the most s

Also in this section
Serica sanguine on Iran sanctions
13 July 2018
The firm's historic links to Iran are in the spotlight as US sanctions resume
The return of cautious optimism in the North Sea
13 July 2018
The UK’s North Sea hub, braced for production declines, has received a boost from new investments and revived interest from the supermajors
China loans make Venezuela’s outlook more precarious
12 July 2018
Patience is wearing thin among both China and other trading partners