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Central Asia

CENTRAL Asia is benefiting from the angst gripping energy consumers worldwide. Central Asian gas, regarded as too difficult to produce by all except Russia at the start of the decade, is now viewed as a desirable resource.

CENTRAL Asia is benefiting from the angst gripping energy consumers worldwide. Central Asian gas, regarded as too difficult to produce by all except Russia at the start of the decade, is now viewed as a desirable resource. Rich uranium mines in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan have caught the attention of countries turning to nuclear-power generation as an alternative to oil and gas. In the 1990s, Western and Russian oil investors were the principal investors in the region. Now, Asian – particularly Chinese – companies are playing a much more prominent role. State-owned companies from South Korea, India and China are negotiating for blocks in the Caspian Sea offshore Kazakhstan – by far the most s

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