Tankers
The tide turns for tanker sector
9 March 2009
Lower oil prices and the economic downturn make the outlook less certain for tanker owners, but shipbuilders still have substantial orders on their books
Too much of a good thing
1 March 2006
Times are still good for shipping companies, although weaker growth in global oil demand and rising fleet capacity could dampen earnings this year. Martin Clark reports
Majors shift position
1 March 2006
While there is no rush among oil companies to return to shipping, there are signs of a mini revival, prompted by the growth of LNG trade, writes Martin Clark
How shipping companies can insure revenue
1 June 2005
When shipowners consider insurance they usually have in mind tankers going aground, loss of cargo, pollution and reputation risk – think of Prestige, Exxon Valdez, Erika and Sea Empress. But the freight rates shipowners and charterers pay, or receive, have become less predictable and that has presented them with a new source of risk, writes Adam Sonin, head of shipping derivatives at ACM/GFI
A year to remember
1 March 2005
Last year will be remembered by oil-shipping firms for a long time to come for record profits and for being the year that Wall Street finally sat up and took notice of the tanker industry, writes Martin Clark
The devil is in the data
1 October 2004
While rising oil prices have been grabbing the headlines, the cost of shipping oil has also been increasing sharply. Liz Bossley examines escalating costs and volatility in the tanker market and looks at the largely ignored shipping data that tracks vessels and accounts for the rising price trend
The Bosphorus bottleneck
1 June 2004
Winter congestion in the Turkish straits, the narrow waterway linking the Black Sea with the Mediterranean, wreaked havoc in the tanker market at the turn of the year, sending freight rates soaring. Unfortunately for Russian exporters, waiting up to a month to ship oil out, a solution may be some way off, writes Martin Clark
Troubled waters
1 March 2004
After a year of highs and lows, the global shipping industry is finally facing up to some hard truths. Environmental pressures are set to grow and with them financial pressures, as banks move away from smaller, less-well-known operators, writes Martin Clark
Disaster spurs investment
1 March 2003
European governments launched an assault on the tanker industry when the Prestige sank at the end of 2002, spilling oil along the Spanish and French coasts. But the haste to remove single-hull vessels from service could have a major effect on the industry, writes Sidney Holloway
Northwest Europe: an upturn
1 January 2003
For terminal operators at the gateway ports supplying the European hinterland, 2002 was a much better year than 2001. Uncertainties in the Middle East, an increase in the number of products grades, the return of contangoes and some new trading patterns have all helped business, Martin Quinlan writes
Earnings slump
1 March 2002
Everything seems to be moving in the wrong direction for tanker owners. The dynamics of oil shipments are also changing, as non-Opec producers raise output to the detriment of Mideast producers, changing patterns in oil routes and reducing tonne-mile shipments. Owners of LPG carriers also face a weaker market and, with gas prices depressed, there are unlikely to be major changes for LNG, writes Sidney Holloway
Building for the future
30 December 1998
The shipbuilding industry is enjoying a boom and the energy industry is driving much of the growth. Martin Clark reports