Related Articles
Forward article link
Share PDF with colleagues

Iraq’s lingering power crisis costing $40 billion a year

It will take longer than the government hopes to fix the country’s electricity problem

If the Iraqi government’s provision of basic energy to its people were to be a factor in April’s parliamentary election, you wouldn’t blame voters for just sitting at home in the dark. Generation capacity is rising and things are better than they were. But even in Baghdad and Tikrit, the two towns given preferential access to electricity under Saddam Hussein, supply is poor and brownouts common. Most of Iraq still doesn’t have adequate connection to the dilapidated grid. Outside Kurdistan, only Iraqis rich enough to afford a private diesel-fired generator can guarantee a full day’s supply. On top of the violence and terrorism still hurting parts of the country, the lack of electricity provi

Also in this section
Electric charge for EVs in Norway
18 October 2017
The electric vehicle market is expanding rapidly in Europe but a lack of sufficient infrastructure remains a problem. Christina Bu, Secretary General of the Norwegian Electric Vehicle Association explains all
Russia's LNG threat boosts export liberalisation prospects
17 October 2017
Don't expect the market to be freed up anytime soon, but Russia is at least thinking about busting Gazprom's monopoly on pipeline gas supply
Nord Stream 2: Pay your money, take your choice
6 October 2017
The pipeline faces a tough financing climate and continued opposition