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Gas shortages force Chinese long term shale action

Residential gas demand could rise up to tenfold in some cities this winter, but results from shale aren't expected until 2020

The pace of unconventional gas development, particularly shale and coal-bed methane, will play a critical role in meeting China's ballooning gas demand, but not before 2020. However this will provide renewed opportunities for foreign companies, says Wood Mackenzie. Northern China will see residential gas demand rise up to tenfold from non-peak requirements in some cities this winter. To meet this, China will be forced to rely on spot imports due to limitations on domestic production and contracted supply. More significantly, this is indicative of likely winter gas shortages through the rest of the decade. For this reason, the struggle to keep northern China warm through winter calls for ur

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