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EVs supercharged incentives

If governments want more EVs, they’ll have to pay consumers to buy them and manufacturers to make them—at least for now

Electric vehicles (EVs) can't yet compete with internal-combustion-engine (Ice) rivals. So, if their market share is to keep growing, governments will have to support the trend. Making EVs cheap enough that buyers ditch their gasoline or diesel engine will be key. But manufacturers will probably need some incentives to get mass development under way too. "Possibly the most significant [contributors] are regulatory policies on the auto sector that aren't consumer-facing," says Scott Shepard, an analyst at Navigant Research, a consultancy specialising in green tech. "For example, fuel-efficiency regulations, or credit-trading schemes among auto companies." "If you're in compliance, you have

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