Trends
Opec threats keep prices high
1 March 2005
Crude prices remained strong in February, as markets shrugged off some bearish stock-builds in the US. Houston spot WTI topped $48/b on 18 February and Nymex March and April WTI futures both broke though $49/b
Opec cuts take effect
1 March 2005
A structural change begins
1 February 2005
With energy markets experiencing extreme price volatility, the need for hedging has never been greater. Historically, coal was considered unsuitable for financial trades, but the development of an OTC and futures market in the US is providing security for producers and consumers, writes Ellen Lask
Saudis drive regional production growth
1 February 2005
Saudi Aramco entered the new year with plans to kick-start a number of expansion programmes. With other Middle East producers also looking to boost crude production, James Gavin reports on prospects for near-term increases in Opec output capacity
Back to the old paradigm
1 February 2005
In an article in , in September of 2002, I was quoted as saying that oil prices were likely to climb above $50/b if war broke out in Iraq. This was not speculation, but reflected 20 years' history of oil-price behaviour, writes Phillip Ellis, head of global oil, Boston Consulting Group, London
London's oil rush
1 January 2005
Stock markets in the City of London witnessed an oil bonanza last year, with a number of small oil and gas companies joining the City's Alternative Investment Market. Comparisons are being made with the dot.com boom, but, writes Steve Hawkes, the interest in oil stocks is based on much stronger fundamentals
The lifeblood of US oil
1 January 2005
When oil and gas prices hit record lows in the late 1990s, owner/operators of low-volume stripper wells were forced to shut in or plug and abandon many of their wells. So, with prices near all-time highs, are those operators scrambling to bring those assets back on line? Not necessarily, reports Anne Feltus
Holding steady
1 January 2005
Paying the price
1 January 2005
High oil prices threaten to take a toll on developing Asian economies, assisted by the region's poor energy efficiency and fondness for costly fuel subsidies. Paradoxically, this could be for the best. Cris Heaton reports
Bulls in pole position
1 January 2005
World oil markets are adjusting to the new reality of lower spare capacity, greater volatility and a higher range of prices. A US dollar crisis, or a slow-down in world demand coinciding with a surge in new supply, could see prices fall substantially. But in all probability - with Chinese expansion continuing relentlessly, Iraq unstable and relations between the US and Iran deteriorating - oil prices will remain strong, argue Roger Diwan and Jamal Qureshi of PFC Energy
What goes up ...
1 December 2004
Crude prices last month slumped from October's record highs, with WTI shedding $10/b between late October and mid-November
Hot spots and cold weather
1 November 2004
More improvement from Iraq
1 November 2004