Trends
ExxonMobil's Nigerian output still shut in
1 April 2008
ExxonMobil's 0.8m barrels a day of Nigerian production remains shut in, a local company source has confirmed. That means that, despite a modest easing in oil prices yesterday, the market remains well supported.
Quantum leap
1 April 2008
To realise the potential of solar energy will require technological and scientific advances to enable the full energy cycle of capture, conversion and storage to be integrated into an interdependent, synergistic and globally scalable system. By Nathan Lewis, professor of chemistry, Beckman Institute and Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology
The bulls return
1 April 2008
OIL PRICES look set to remain strong this week after bullish comments from Opec, a new forecast from the US' Department of Energy (DOE) and a fire at a refinery in Europe combined to inject strength into the markets.
The blade's the thing
1 March 2008
As demand for renewable, clean energy grows, blade design is receiving greater attention as researchers attempt to improve efficiency and reduce costs, writes Anne Feltus
The power of wind
1 March 2008
Wind energy is competitive, inexhaustible, free and clean; it reduces dependence on imported energy and can be ramped up fast. Wind has developed from being an alternative energy to a high-tech, competitive and extremely reliable source on par with oil and gas. By Peter W Kruse, vice-president, group communications, Vestas Wind Systems
Uncharted waters
1 March 2008
Oil prices have set new highs at around $110 a barrel and are showing little sign of easing. On Tuesday, US light-crude futures reached a record high of $109.72/b; Brent futures, also breaking new ground, almost reached $106/b.
Another record week, but it can't go on
1 March 2008
Another week, another record: crude reached new highs on Monday – $111.80 a barrel in the case of New York light oil futures for April delivery and $107.97/b in the case of May Brent.
Russia: more investment needed DUPLICATE 2745863
1 March 2008
While the world has been fretting about oil prices near $100 a barrel, what it should really be worried about is gas. Europe today and the US in the future are moving towards a staggering dependence on imported natural gas. By Nadejda Victor, Program on Energy and Sustainable Development, Stanford University
Keeping the Putin ship steady
1 March 2008
Will Dmitry Medvedev's ascendancy to the Russian presidency mark a shift in the country's energy policy? Derek Brower reports
More of the same
1 March 2008
Oil prices have this week eased by some $10 a barrel from last week's highs around the $110/b level, but appear to have found solid support at $100/b. And there is a greater chance of a move to the upside than to the downside.
Market awaits Opec decision
1 March 2008
WITH oil markets trading at record-breaking prices, all eyes are on Opec tomorrow as the group meets in Vienna to decide whether to keep its production quotas unchanged – or cut output in support of prices. Market sentiment appeared to accept that the cartel would roll over existing quotas, despite calls from consumers to release more oil onto the market.
GTL: an industry in the making
1 March 2008
GTL suits a world where transport-fuels demand is for high performance products with lower emissions – that is the world of today and tomorrow. By Malcolm Wells, communications manager, Sasol Chevron
A new role for NOCs in a challenging energy sector
1 February 2008
No NOC or IOC, no matter how large or capable, has all the answers to the challenges ahead. Without co-operation, the energy sector will unlikely be able to make the $20 trillion investment in infrastructure necessary to meet rising demand. By Milton Costa Filho, general manager, and Pedro Martínez Lara, technical assistant, Petrobras Mexico
Nigeria and Venezuela constrain the bears
1 February 2008
Volatility in the crude markets persists, as bearish sentiment last week gave way to a sharp spike in the price of oil in New York. The contract for March delivery of light sweet crude was trading at $91.88/b on Monday, up by around $3.50/b from Thursday.
Japan pays a high price for nuclear setbacks
1 February 2008
The shut-down of two nuclear plants has forced utilities to pay high prices for spot LNG cargoes. But with negligible indigenous energy resources, import-dependent Japan has little choice, writes Ian Lewis
Japan: gas industry plays its part in fight against global warming
1 February 2008
The gas industry in Japan faces a number of challenges – market deregulation, rising LNG prices and the need to reduce emissions. The Japan Gas Association's Gas Vision 2030 encompasses a number of initiatives that aim to reduce significantly CO2 emissions by 2030. By Haruki Takahashi, vice-chairman, the Japan Gas Association
Prices on the rise
1 February 2008
Several days of strong buying have pushed oil prices back into the mid-$90/b range. On Monday, the market consolidated gains of more than $8/b in the past week. In London, the price for Brent crude for April delivery had increased to more than $95/b. In New York, the contract for March delivery of light sweet crude oil traded at up to $96.24/b.
All eyes on the US
1 February 2008
The chances of a further weakening in oil prices are increasing as concern over the economic outlook for the US, the world's largest energy consumer, builds. For now, prices are proving resilient: at around $90 a barrel, futures are level with last week and are still only 10% below the record high of above $100/b set at the start of the year.
Opec unlikely to rock the boat
1 February 2008
Oil prices remain at around $100 a barrel and are likely to hold steady over the next few days. On Tuesday, Nymex light crude futures were trading at just over $99/b and Brent futures were just short of $98/b.
Proponents on the defensive
1 February 2008
Proponents of biofuels in the transport sector have been forced on to the defensive by findings suggesting the environmental benefits may not be as great as previously suggested. But Western governments still believe the sector has a big future, writes Ian Lewis