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Running the rule on US supply

The head of the EIA discusses the market, the debate over fracking and what the future holds for the country’s energy data

The worst is probably over for America's tight oil producers, and prices should tick up next year as supply and demand come closer to balance, but the collapse in investment across the industry is putting the oil market in a perilous position. That's the view from the US capital. "We think Brent crude prices are going to recover to above $50 in 2017 on average compared to $42 in 2016. That should then result in oil production bottoming out and coming back up again," the head of the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Adam Sieminski, told Petroleum Economist at the Department of Energy in Washington DC. The EIA sees the third quarter of this year as a low point for domestic US crude ou

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