Related Articles
Forward article link
Share PDF with colleagues

Uncertain times for nuclear after Fukushima

With the rise of cheaper and safer alternatives, in addition to the Fukushima Dai'ichi disaster in 2011, is this the end of the line for nuclear power?

Nuclear power has the low-carbon credentials to give it a larger stake in the global energy mix over the next few decades, but its future will depend on government financing and public acceptance that the fuel is safe. The International Energy Agency (IEA) says demand for nuclear power could reach 1.119 billion tonnes of oil equivalent (toe) by 2035, up from 674 million toe in 2011. This will vary regionally, with non-OECD countries expected to provide the bulk of growth in the sector. The IEA expects China to account for around half of the global increase in nuclear capacity between now and to 2035, followed by South Korea, India and Russia. In Europe, by contrast, more capacity will be d

Also in this section
Good winds ahead
13 July 2017
World Energy Focus talks to Michael Hannibal, chief executive of Offshore operations Siemens Gamesa, the company's renewables division, about what has driven its development and how the industry plans to continue to drive down the cost of renewable energy
Green light for Egypt’s renewables
3 July 2017
After several quiet years, the sector is expanding to help meet power needs
Oil firms need to come clean on climate threat
26 June 2017
The sector must step up its investments in clean energy and efforts to mitigate climate change or risk being left with expensive, stranded assets, says a new report