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Uncertain times for nuclear after Fukushima

With the rise of cheaper and safer alternatives, in addition to the Fukushima Dai'ichi disaster in 2011, is this the end of the line for nuclear power?

Nuclear power has the low-carbon credentials to give it a larger stake in the global energy mix over the next few decades, but its future will depend on government financing and public acceptance that the fuel is safe. The International Energy Agency (IEA) says demand for nuclear power could reach 1.119 billion tonnes of oil equivalent (toe) by 2035, up from 674 million toe in 2011. This will vary regionally, with non-OECD countries expected to provide the bulk of growth in the sector. The IEA expects China to account for around half of the global increase in nuclear capacity between now and to 2035, followed by South Korea, India and Russia. In Europe, by contrast, more capacity will be d

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