Related Articles
Forward article link
Share PDF with colleagues

What Japan's Fukushima crisis means for gas

Fukushima's setback for nuclear power creates new opportunities for natural gas – now and in the future

For the nuclear industry, the images broadcast around the world from the stricken Fukushima-Daiichi plant and the accompanying headlines warning of meltdown were the realisation of a recurring nightmare. Over the past decade, concerns about climate change have prompted a shift in attitude towards nuclear power, especially as it can help reduce electricity generation's carbon intensity. The industry's big fear throughout this nuclear renaissance, however, was the possibility of an accident on the scale of Three Mile Island, or even Chernobyl. Fukushima may not be another Chernobyl, but the broad consensus is that the incident is far more serious than the partial-meltdown at Three Mile Island

Also in this section
Morocco's renewables revolution
19 October 2017
The kingdom is expanding its use of solar and wind power rapidly through research and innovation, say Badr Ikken General Director of the Research Institute for Solar Energy and New Energies of Morocco (IRESEN) and Zakaria Naimi, its Director of Photovoltaic and Electric Systems
Solar PV growth outpaces all other fuels — and will continue to grow
11 October 2017
Renewables broke new records in 2016, largely as a result of booming solar photovoltaics (PV) deployed in the People’s Republic of China, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA)
The other damaging glut
2 October 2017
Emissions-trading systems have suffered from an oversupply of permits. Regulators are trying to fix that and show the mechanisms can still work