Related Articles
Forward article link
Share PDF with colleagues

Japanese energy dims but still burns after Fukushima

What does Japan’s energy picture look like in the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami?

Japan's post-earthquake energy market is a chaotic and evolving story. Two threads runs through it: what is the future for Japan’s nuclear power plants; and how much natural gas will it need to make up for lost generating capacity? On 11 March, the largest earthquake yet to hit Japan struck off the coast of Sendai and as massive tsunami waves smashed into the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant, Japan’s energy landscape changed forever. The wall of rushing water damaged some nuclear reactors, safety triggers shut others during the quake and a few were already shut and undergoing periodic maintenance. Capacity shutdown French investment bank Société Générale (SocGen) estimates 8.6 gigawa

Also in this section
Morocco's renewables revolution
19 October 2017
The kingdom is expanding its use of solar and wind power rapidly through research and innovation, say Badr Ikken General Director of the Research Institute for Solar Energy and New Energies of Morocco (IRESEN) and Zakaria Naimi, its Director of Photovoltaic and Electric Systems
Solar PV growth outpaces all other fuels — and will continue to grow
11 October 2017
Renewables broke new records in 2016, largely as a result of booming solar photovoltaics (PV) deployed in the People’s Republic of China, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA)
The other damaging glut
2 October 2017
Emissions-trading systems have suffered from an oversupply of permits. Regulators are trying to fix that and show the mechanisms can still work