Putting CCS to the test

15 July 2013

Norway is set to be the proving ground for large-scale carbon capture and sequestration. Despite delays and spiralling costs, the country's hope to be the first to develop a commercial, industrial-scale facility may become reality. Justin Jacobs reports from the Mongstad test facility

IF THE world is going to continue burning fossil fuels, carbon capture and storage (CCS) will have to be a critical tool in the fight against climate change, the International Energy Agency (IEA) warned in a July roadmap report for the technology. It was the latest in series of similar calls made over the past few years to try and rally greater political and industry support for CCS. Yet development of CCS - a suite of technologies that captures carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power plants and other industrial sites and transports the greenhouse gas to underground reservoirs for storage - has been painfully slow. Although the individual components involved in the CCS process have been in use for some time, they have still not yet been brought together in an industrial-scale commercial project. The technology has been hampered by high costs and a lack of incentives, most notably an...



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