Opec seeking stability

11 December 2012

Derek Brower, VIENNA: When the biggest excitement around an Opec meeting is about a technocratic appointment to head the group's secretariat, oil traders can rest easy. Opec meets in Vienna on 12 December with oil consistently trading within a price range that should satisfy both the group's price hawks - Algeria, Iran, Iraq and Venezuela - and the doves of the Gulf, led by Saudi Arabia. That suggests the group will roll over its 30 million barrel a day (b/d) production ceiling tomorrow. Any efforts - possibly led by Iran - to persuade Opec to lower the ceiling will be rejected by Saudi Arabia, the group's lynchpin. The Kingdom has spent the past eight months insisting that prices should ease back towards $100/b to help struggling consumer economies. It has not yet changed its mind. In the afternoon on 11 December, front-month Brent was trading up at around $107.80 a...



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