Large scale LNG exports will boost US economy, report says

11 December 2012

The reports findings are expected to swing government policy in favour of commercial LNG exports

Shaun Polczer, CALGARY

A twice-delayed Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned report concluded that the US would receive "net economic benefits" from large-scale liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports. However, the gains will be offset by declines in manufacturing and other sectors which rely on cheap natural gas prices, according to NERA Economic Consulting’s report, The Macroeconomic Impacts of LNG Exports from the US, released on 5 December. The report’s findings are expected to form the basis of future government policy allowing commercial LNG exports. Depending on volumes exported, the report concluded the US could see positive GDP growth. Its reference case pointed to GDP...



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